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Latest Inductee into the Hall of Fame

Ettore BugattiEttore Bugatti
Ettore Arco Isidoro Bugatti was born in Milan on 15 September 1881. He grew up within an artistic French family and at a young age Bugatti demonstrated a deep instinctive understanding of motor-vehicle construction. Although his co-workers often had to scrutinize his designs for their technical feasibility, the final result was always a perfectly proportioned automobile, which, from an aesthetic standpoint, was impossible to resist. As a passionate horse lover, Bugatti liked to call his meticulous creations “Pur Sang”, or thoroughbreds. READ MORE

 
 

The Sport that is Formula 1

Autodromo di MonzaLotteries and automobile racing in Europe have a long tradition. In Italy after the war the Grand Prix of Italy at the Autodromo Monza was coupled with the Monza Lottery. In 1954 prizes were awarded according to the outcome of the Supercortemaggiore Grand Prix, a 1,000 kilometre (620 mi) race sponsored by Italy's major oil company and reserved for Sports Category cars up to 5,000 cc.

Today a leader in safe and responsible online betting, Betway delivers world-class sports betting, casino and poker to over 1.8 million customers worldwide. Since its launch in 2006, Betway has remained at the forefront of the online gaming industry, using the very latest software to provide an interactive and innovative gaming experience, within a safe and secure online environment.

 
 
 

Fiat - Rooftop Test TrackWhen one thinks of Fiat these days most think of small quirky cars never imagining that in the first decades of the 20th century engineers at Fiat in both the automotive and aviation fields led the world in innovation. In fact five years after the beginnings of the firm, Fiat was already racing and winning in international events both in Europe and America.

L.J.K. Setright said of these men: These are the men who created a new kind of racing car, whose technical inspiration was broadcast as a seed to germinate in all leading countries of the motor manufacturing world,who created a new dynasty and set new fashions which were to endure un broken for a dozen years and to be revived periodically and successfully at intervals there after. A company wag was once heard to remark that at Fiat "we do not copy ... we teach". READ MORE

 
Be sure to visit the Grand prix History Book Shop
Mon Ami Mate by Chris Nixon A Racing Motorist  by S.C.H. Davis Gentlemen, Start Your Engines by Wilbur Shaw Grands Prix 1934-1939 by Rodney Walkerley Full Throttle by Tim Birkin Auto Union V16 - A Technical Appraisal by Ian Bamsey Sir Henry Segrave by Cyril Posthumus Managing a Legend by Robert Edwards It was Fun!: My Fifty Years of High Performance Power and Glory by Wiliam Court My Cars, My Career by Stirling Moss

CONTENTS

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COLUMNS

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    Artist Gallery

    National Motor Museum at Beaulieu

    Cars on Stamps

    Cigarette Cards

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TEAMS

CIRCUITS

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    Red Bull Racing
   
Lotus F1 Team

    Manor F1 Team

    Mercedes GP

    Sauber F1 Team

    Circuit Villeneuve

    Goodwood

    Laguna-Seca

    Le Mans

    Autodromo Monza

    Imola
 
  Spa Francorchamps

    Nurburgring
    Vintage Racing

 
 

The Art of Race Car Driving

"At the first bend, I had the clear sensation that Tazio had taken it badly and that we would end up in the ditch; I felt myself stiffen as I waited for the crunch. Instead, we found ourselves on the next straight with the car in a perfect position. I looked at him, his rugged face was calm, just as it always was, and certainly not the face of someone who had just escaped a hair-raising spin. I had the same sensation at the second bend. By the fourth or fifth bend I began to understand; in the meantime, I had noticed that through the entire bend Tazio did not lift his foot from the accelerator, and that, in fact, it was flat on the floor. As bend followed bend, I discovered his secret. Nuvolari entered the bend somewhat earlier than my driver's instinct would have told me to. But he went into the bend in an unusual way: with one movement he aimed the nose of the car at the inside edge, just where the curve itself started. His foot was flat down, and he had obviously changed down to the right gear before going through this fearsome rigmarole. In this way he put the car into a four-wheel drift, making the most of the thrust of the centrifugal force and keeping it on the road with the traction of the driving wheels. Throughout the bend the car shaved the inside edge, and when the bend turned into the straight the car was in the normal position for accelerating down it, with no need for any corrections." READ MORE

 
Formula 1 - Harvesting Power

If you've been paying attention to Formula 1, engines have been replaced by power units and they've gotten a lot quieter as well, to the consternation of many of F1's most rabid fans; welcome to the hybrid era. With fuel per race limited to 100 kg, and the fuel flow rate not to exceed 100 kg/h the new engines power units are all about harvesting power.

Replacing the old KERS is a Hybrid Energy Recovery System or ERS which consists of two motor generator units – the MGU-H, recovering energy from the exhaust and the MGU-K recovering energy from braking. The harvested energy is stored in a sophisticated battery arrangement all controlled by ... you guessed it, a computer. The combined maximum power output will be around 760bhp similar to the output of the rev limited V8’s of 2013. The most successful implementation of this new technology so far has been the Mercedes F1 W05 Hybrid READ MORE

 
 

It began with demonstration runs such as one that took place on the 22nd of July, 1894 in front of a fascinated public for these strange carriages that drove themselves or at least seemed to. The trail as it was called would cover the distance from Paris to Rouen and was organized by the journalist Pierre Giffard of Le Petit Journal; a judging-panel decided on the winner. The paper promoted it as 'Le Petit Journal' Competition for Horseless Carriages (Le Petit Journal Concours des Voitures sans Chevaux) that were not dangerous, easy to drive, and cheap during the journey, the main prize being for the competitor whose car comes closest to the ideal. The announcement in Le Petit Journal on 19 December 1893 expressly denied that it would be a race - ce ne sera pas une course. The easy to drive clause effectively precluded from the prizes any vehicles needing a traveling mechanic or technical assistant such as a stoker.

While the event drew huge crowds the organizers soon realized that the criteria for judging a winner was lost upon the spectators who would show up to watch, what for them was a spectacle. Something else needed to be done to allow a manufacturer to promote the superiority of their product for inventions were all well and good but this was no scientific exercise, cars needed to be sold. The obvious solution was something that was denied at Paris-Rouen, a race and with the victory goes the spoils. Reliability was what the manufacturers were after but the public would crave speed. READ MORE

 

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Grand Prix Automobile de Pau, 19492nd International Barcelona Grand PrixLe MansA Poster for the Grand Prix D'Europe to Be Held at Bern on 3/4th July 1948Monte Carlo Grand PrixLe Grand Defi Monaco, 18 Mars, 1990

 
 

The Stuff of Champions - The Monaco Grand Prix of 1970

The unsuccessful attempt to produce a competitive four-wheel drive car for Formula 1 had finally run its course, Lotus reluctantly abandoned the effort and set about designing a car that would return them to the top. That car would be the famous Lotus 72 but after its disappointing debut at Jarama, Rindt was resigned to drive the old Lotus 49C at the next race, Monaco. Rindt had come to Lotus in 1969 and was very much a man in a hurry. He often spoke of making one major attempt at the World Championship before retiring and in his mind this would be the year. He was hesitant about joining Lotus as he felt that their cars were un-safe and after his accident at Jarama the year before, when his rear-wing failed he was even more certain of this being the case but he also knew that when Lotus got it right they could be unstoppable ... READ MORE

 
   
 
 
The History of the Slot Car

ScalextricIn 1939 Bentram "Fred" Francis 1939 started a tool-making company, which ran twenty-four hours a day throughout the war years. Two years after the armistice turned to a gentler cliental following a childhood ambition to become a toy-maker, and founded Minimodels Ltd which, among other toys, produced Scalex and Startex clockwork cars. What separated his Scalex cars from the competition was that a hidden fifth wheel discarded with the need for a key. By 1952 demand for Minimodels toys was so great that in order to expand the company relocated to a new, purpose-built factory at Havant in Hampshire but as often happens with toys the public soon was demanding something new.

ScalextricAt a London toy fair Francis saw a display featuring battery-powered cars running around a track, but without user control. As a true toy man he knew straight away what was missing, real 'play value'. After six months of investigation and seeing the giddy reactions of his marketing people as they tried to control the now electric-powered Scalex cars - renamed Scalextric convinced Francis that he was onto a winner.

By 1964 Scalextric was well established having signed the 1963 World Champion, Jim Clark to promote their brand. Cars were being produced in factories in France, Australia and New Zealand as well as a manufacturing and distribution agreement in Spain which would evolve in later years to the SCX brand. Also that year the first Scalextric World Championship was held in London. READ MORE.

 
 
   
Achille Varzi Biography Gilles Villeneuve Biography Bernd Rosemeyer Biography Adrian Newey Biography Alain Prost Biography Nelson Piquet Biography Jochen Rindt Biography Rudolf Caracciola Biography Jimmy Clark Biography Juan Manuel Fangio Biography Graham Hill Biography Stirling Moss Biography Tazio Nuvolari Biography Emerson Fittipaldi Biography Enzo Ferrari Biography Niki Lauda Biography Alberto Ascari Biography Alfred Neubauer Biography Colin Chapman Biography David Bruce-Brown Biography Georges Boillot Biography Jimmy Murphy Biography Ronnie Peterson Biography Jack Brabham Biography Jean-Pierre Wimille Biography Vittorio Jano Biography Johcen Rindt Biography Guy Moll Biography Nigel Mansell Biography Giuseppe Farina Biography Mario Andretti Biography Jackie Stewart Biography Ayrton Senna Biography Felice Nazzaro Biography Pietro Bordino Biography Antonio Ascari Biography Giulio Ramponi Luigi Bazzi Ettore Bugatti Michael Schumacher Biography Camille Jenatzy Biography Ferdinand Porsche Biography Leon Thery Biography Hall of Fame